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Dehydration: Causes and Remedies

Dehydration remediesDehydration occurs when the body loses essential fluids, including salts and minerals. There is a myth associated with dehydration that it is primarily caused by heat. Heat does contribute to dehydration, but it is not the main source. One can get dehydrated even in cool conditions. This is because cold air is dryer than hot air and the dryness is what causes dehydration. So, you can get even more dehydrated in cold weather. By compounding the low temperature and low humidity with altitude you can lose 2 quarts an hour without even realizing that you have. However, there are other factors that commonly can lead to dehydration. They are air conditioning, antihistamines, decongestants, caffeine and alcohol. When dehydration occurs due to these external factors, you will experience symptoms like impaired mental acuity, slower decision making ability, forgetfulness, transposing terms, inefficiency at work, recreational activities, stiff aching muscles and headache. These effects start showing up even before you feel thirsty. Mental processes let you recognize that you are thirsty. A lot of people override their thirst reflex, as they are too busy with their day to day chores. An Ironman Triathlon Champion Scott Tinley said, “You’ve got to keep thinkin’ drinkin’!”

Air conditioning: We have often noticed that water drips off air conditioners. Have you ever wondered why this happens? When the outside air circulates through an air conditioner and is cooled, moisture is lost and the amount of water vapor in the air decreases. Additionally the cool air also takes away the moisture from your lungs as you breathe. We experience this in dry humid areas and hot conditions but not in cooler regions. The relative humidity drops 50-70% as the air is cooled. The same is true of cold winter air; it holds far less moisture than warm air, another reason people catch cold during the winter, it is not just the cold weather. Also, people often fall sick after flight journeys. This happens because you lose a lot of fluids as a result of air conditioning and low air pressure, further causing cold or flu. Try our Natural Lemonade Vitalyte Sticks . These energy sticks are made with essential electrolytes in the proper ratios, Vitalyte’s isotonic formula replenishes lost electrolytes incredibly fast. Vitalyte electrolyte drink mix is not only advanced hydration, but also a great barrier against oxidative stress brought on by physical activity.

replenish electrolytes easily

Replenish electrolytes easily

Antihistamines and decongestants: Both work by dehydrating the cells and can have a profound effect on mental acuity. This is why airline pilots are not permitted to use them less than eight hours before flying. Don’t you wish that this requirement applied to surgeons and others in such decision-intensive jobs? This can also affect the performance of athletes, especially ones who depend upon fast reactions like tennis or handball. Have you noticed how many more errors are made in the final innings of a baseball game or the last quarter of a football game? This happens as a result of fatigue caused by dehydration. What is needed is a hydrating drink mix that will replace electrolytes to provide athletes with an edge. One such replacement drink mix is Fruit Punch Vitalyte Sticks.  Made with fruit punch flavor, these sticks will provide you with the hydration required to perform your best.

Caffeine is a diuretic causing you to lose fluids via the kidneys, more fluids than you have in that cup of coffee or soft drink. Recent studies indicate that people who drink more caffeine may have built up a tolerance and may not lose as much of what they drink as less frequent users. Another study indicates that these “heavy drinkers” may be chronically dehydrated and, therefore, can’t lose much more fluid. Alcohol is also causes you to lose more fluid than you drink, more than caffeine because it is an anti-antidiuretic. It suppresses the anti-diuretic hormone required to reduce blood pressure by acting on kidneys and blood vessels. Read more. What can be more dangerous is the systemic loss of fluids. Alcohol also pulls water directly from the tissues, especially affecting the stomach, liver and brain and ultimately damaging these organs. Our Electrolyte Replacement products had not been IN the market long before we at VITALYTE™ started getting testimonials about how effective it is in alleviating the effects of hangovers. We at VITALYTE™ believe that health is wealth and working out is not merely a physical activity but a means to restore your life. Keep yourself hydrated by avoiding these factors that contribute to dehydration or, if you can’t avoid them, anticipate the need to stay hydrated by drinking enough VITALYTE . When you know you’re going to be losing fluids, like when you’re taking a trip, going skiing, summiting a 14’er or having one too many on a Saturday night… and remember Scott Tinley’s advice: “You’ve got to keep thinkin’ drinkin’!”

photo credit: pintrest

Not Your Typical Runner

Berea Thompson — Vitalyte Brand Ambassador

Each race we host along the Huntington Beach bike trail teaches me something about running, and the HB Ocean Run on May 17th did once again!

If you looked at the crowd of 50 people standing on the beach that day, you would have thought maybe they were meeting for a beach clean up, or possibly a group book club, or maybe some sort of AA support group (they actually host these meetings down by Beach Blvd), but you probably wouldn’t have thought they were all athletes about to run their hearts out for a 5k, 10k 15k, or a half-marathon! That’s because they didn’t look like societies “stero-typical” runner.

Before getting into the racing scene (running in local non-profit 5k fundraiser, joining the craziness at big Rock ‘n Roll Marathons and then eventually hosting my own races) I would have told someone a typical runner is a single 22 year old that’s super tall, a model of fitness, geared up in Nike DriFIT, and prances like a gazelle when running (and their hair flowing all the same). But I would have been totally wrong!

If you look at national survey data by runningusa.org they found the typical female runner is married of the age 39, 5’5”, 140 lb and motivated to run in order to stay in shape. The typical male runner is married of the age 44, 5’10”, 174 lb and also motivated to run in order to stay in shape. Although their favorite running apparel is Nike, I had everything else wrong!

I’m glad my stereotypical view of a runner was wrong! I see every age, race, size, and shape at our races and I love it, because running is for everyone! The fastest 5k runner at the Ocean Run was a 66 year old man. The second fastest half marathon runner was a 45 year old woman. And the 10k neck and neck race to the finish was between two men well above their 20’s :)

All you need to do to be a runner is to strap on a pair of shoes and hit the pavement. It doesn’t matter the distance you go or the speed you travel as long as you are out there giving it your all and enjoying every minute. Besides, with Vitalytes greatest Electrolyte Drink you will feel just like that gazelle runner!

Utah Rock Climbing

Jackie Hueftle — Vitalyte Brand Ambassador

I recently celebrated my 32nd birthday. This birthday was special for me in a few ways, perhaps mostly because now I have been climbing for half my life. As noted in my previous post I began climbing around my 16th birthday. Since then climbing has become the center around which my life revolves.

IMG_9494

In the end of March I flew to Las Vegas to meet up with my boyfriend Chris and attend the Red Rocks Rendezvous. In this annual event pro climbers teach clinics on all aspects ofclimbing, and Chris was scheduled to teach several bouldering clinics. Even though I live in dry Colorado, the Vegas desert is even drier and more demanding and I was grateful I’d packed some Vitalyte to keep me hydrated when we went bouldering and taught clinics in Calico Basin.

From Vegas we headed to Zion National Park in Utah. Zion is a dramatic and beautiful canyon full of stunning red sandstone walls that seem to reach to the sky. I’d never been to Zion and I wanted to see something new for my birthday so we drove out there and explored the canyon before spending a the night in the very full campground with some friendly Coloradans who offered to share their site with us.

The next day was cold and windy with a prediction of rain or snow so we bid adieu to our new friends and drove out the other end of Zion toward Bryce Canyon National Park.

IMG_9511I grew up reading Edward Abbey novels and though I’ve spent time around Moab, Lake Powell, and Indian Creek, I’d never actually seen the rest of Southern Utah that I’ve read so much about. Bryce Canyon’s first overlook is the stunning Bryce Amphitheater (PIC), and were it a bit warmer we would have liked to explore it. As it was we decided to continue on and took the scenic Highway 12 north and east toward Capital Reef National Park.

There’s a lot of beautiful land in Utah and the rock formations in and out of the parks were extraordinary. We saw petroglyphs, pictographs, ancient and still-operating ranches, rivers, and lots and lots of crazy rock formations. As climbers, there was potential everywhere. As travelers, we were glad to have Vitalyte to drink because it’s easy to get dehydrated on long car rides and Vitalyte is a quick and tasty way to get yourself back on the right side of hydration.

IMG_9489Finally we ended up in the mountains where we had a somewhat scary drive through a snowstorm on a muddy ranch road and found some great camping and climbing high above the valley floor. We enjoyed a few days of complete isolation in which we saw nobody and didn’t even have cell service as we explored the boulders. The weather was mixed, with several snowstorms blowing through and blue skies in between. The wind was taxing on the middle day, and in the afternoon we were forced to retreat to the car where we ate soup and drank Vitalyte as an afternoon snack to help us recover from the harsh conditions. The last day in the mountains was the worst weather-wise, and instead of staying the night and risking getting suck on the muddy road again we packed up during a dry spell and bailed to the nearest burger stand. From there we drove to a camp spot we know, low and dry, and then the next morning home to Boulder. All in all it was a great birthday week. I saw lots of new things, did some climbing, and had a nice vacation from work and from my cell phone. Now I’m back home and back at work, but I can’t wait for my next adventure!

Hydrating Enough?

Cielo Acosta – Vitalyte Brand Ambassador

I am passionate about hydration, that’s the best way to describe it.  I spent 8 1/2 years as a Seattle bike messenger before I was a runner and firefighter which accustomed me to what I think of as my steam engine metabolism. I need a near constant intake of water along with quality foods, primarily heathy carbs or I become tired and run down. I feel I have to be constantly throwing fuel into my fire otherwise my body grinds to a halt, however if I am hydrating and eating well I can expect high extended performance which is what I aim for. I like my fluids, I need my fluids, I am sensitive to my body’s need to be adequately hydrated and water is my beverage of choice. Unfortunately water isn’t always enough.

It disturbs me to hear studies say up to 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated but I believe it. I see an increase in coffee consumption and soda consumption both of which can be dehydrating. People believe since they are drinking fluids they must be hydrating themselves when really it is the opposite. I’ve talked to people who seldom drink water at all.
The human body is about 60% water. What happens when you aren’t meeting your hydration needs? A host of problems. Our bodies need water to digest and absorb vitamins and nutrients, in addition it detoxifies the liver and kidneys. Lack of water can contribute to an array of medical issues, like fatigue, joint pain, weight gain, headaches, ulcers, high blood pressure, kidney disease and so on.

The commonly used recommendation of 8 8oz glasses doesn’t hold true for everyone but it is a good place to start. Everybody has different activity levels, sizes and shapes which influence hydration needs. Keeping track of your intake for a week can be a good start. Sometimes people think they are drinking more than they actually are so keeping a hydration diary can be great for obtaining an awareness of where you are.

I am constantly evaluating and reassessing my hydration needs. I was thrilled to be selected as a brand ambassador for Vitalyte, a company that produces sports nutrition products with ingredients more natural than what you find in other company’s products. I appreciate the lack of artificial colorings and corn syrup and it works. When I compete and work I do so most often in my fire gear. The gear adds 50 pounds and is very insulating. I loose a lot of water through sweat when wearing my gear due to activity and heat stress. I need more than water to keep hydrated and balanced. That’s why when I was first introduced to Vitalyte’s electrolyte replacement powder I jumped on it. It can easily be added to hydration packs and water bottles and is quickly absorbed. I did a marathon last year in full fire gear with SCBA pack and suffered from mild hyponatremia which is a sodium imbalance, I was drinking mostly water and not enough electrolytes, it was a very uncomfortable and scary experience and took a couple days in bed and lots of pediatric electrolyte replacement beverage to get my system back in balance. I realized then I couldn’t drink plain water in my gear events. Now I pack my bottles and hydration pack with Vitalyte, the last marathon in my gear I felt great.

Today I did the Scott Firefighter Stairclimb, a fundraising event for Leukemia and Lymphoma, I climbed 69 floors of stairs in full fire gear on air from my SCBA in 18:59. I not only lost water through sweat but through respirations. I drank about 34 oz of water with Vitalyte electrolyte replacement powder and 17 oz of water with the tri-phase enduarance before my climb. I notice a reduction in muscular fatigue when I use Vitalyte products and I feel hydrated, I don’t get the water panic I used to get when I was drinking just water because my body is getting the electrolytes it needs.

Hydration can be a tricky thing to figure out because it is so individual but for me Vitalyte’s products make it easier and keep me healthier so I can do the things I want to do.

An Interview of Jackie Hueftle by None Other Than Jackie Hueftle

Jackie: So, Jackie, what do you do? What are you all about?

Jackie: Hi Jackie! I’m a rock climber, routesetter, and freelance writer based in Boulder, Colorado.

Jackie Hueftle setting a comp at The Spot Gym

Jackie: For those not familiar, what is a routesetter?

Jackie: Routesetters are people who put up holds in indoor climbing gyms. Indoor climbingholds are bits of polyurethane in all different shapes that you connect to a climbing wall with bolts or screws. Routesetters use these holds to design courses for people to climb. Tall courses that people climb with a rope for protection are called routes, and short courses where you don’t have a rope and don’t go very high are called boulder problems. I have set routes and boulder problems for several indoor climbing gyms and for major competitions like USAC Climbing Junior Nationals, Mammut Bouldering Championships and other adult level pro events, and the Spot Bouldering Series comps at my home gym, The Spot, in Boulder.

Jackie: Tell me how you got started climbing.

Jackie: I started rock climbing sixteen years ago in a gym in Reno, Nevada and outdoors in the wonderful granite formations around Lake Tahoe. Since then climbing has taken me across North America and Europe and even to China.

Jackie: China?!

Jackie Hueftle Chinese CompJackie: For my first few years I competed in junior competitions and went to Austria as part of Team USA. When I aged out of juniors (around age 19) I turned my focus completely to outdoor climbing, but my friend Patrick was America’s best speed climber and we got invited to China as representatives for the US by the Chinese Mountaineering Association. We were treated like celebrities–taken to the Great Wall, museums, sports centers, and fancy banquets–and we met people from all over the world who we competed against in speed and difficulty events that more of exhibitions. The whole trip was 11 days and it was a really good time.

Jackie: What’s your normal climbing life like?

Jackie: My boyfriend Chris [pro boulderer Chris Schulte] and I spend a lot of time in the winter driving around the American West to world class bouldering areas like Bishop, California; Hueco Tanks, Texas; Las Vegas, Nevada; Moab, Utah; Durango, Colorado; and Joe’s Valley, Utah. I am a guide in Hueco so in addition to climbing myself I help other people by taking them to the backcountry where you have to have a guide to go climbing. Hueco days are lots of flat hiking and lots of fun climbing in the sun.

Jackie: How about in the summer?

Jackie: In the summers we hike into the high alpine areas of Colorado–Mount Evans and Rocky Mountain National Park–where a day of bouldering often requires several miles of uphill hiking before you even get on the rocks. We get lots of visitors from around the world who stay at our house to visit all the alpine bouldering.

Jackie: All that uphill hiking sounds like hard work!

Jackie: It is! But it’s really rewarding to spend a full day outside climbing and hiking in the beautiful Rocky Mountains, even if you have to carry a lot of stuff to make it possible. You get some fantastic views and even though there are usually daily rain and hailstorms, they pass quickly and the rocks dry so you can climb more, and you are often rewarded with a rainbow or a beautiful sunset as well.

Jackie: I bet Vitalyte comes in handy with all that hiking and climbing.

Jackie: It does! We discovered Vitalyte in Las Vegas and after trying it once we were hooked. We liked how well it rehydrated us without leaving us feeling bogged down by too much sugar. The following summer we used Vitalyte in the alpine and were thrilled with how clean it felt to drink and how well it worked. We use Vitalyte for all our trips now, and I drink it at home when I’ve had a long work day and gotten behind on my hydration. We also share it with our visitors who often need help getting hydrated to get used to the higher altitude of Boulder and the even higher altitude of the bouldering areas.

Jackie: Do you work with any other companies?

Jackie: Yes! I represent La Sportiva for climbing shoes and Flashed Climbing for bouldering pads and other gear. I also work with Kilter Climbing Grips, which is a company that makes holds for climbing gyms. I am proud to add Vitalyte to this group of companies, as all are companies I work with because I believe they are the best in the business. Vitalyte is hands down my favorite sports drink I’ve ever used and I’m excited to share it with all my friends in the climbing community.

Jackie: Well, that about sums it up for now. Thanks for the interview, Jackie!

Jackie: No problem Jackie!

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