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Vitalyte electrolyte drink mix and sports nutrition products.
  • Complete Recovery Now Available at REI

    Complete Recovery redefines what recovery means post workout or competition. By understanding the many needs of the modern athlete, Vitalyte Sports Nutrition has designed the most advanced Recovery Formula on the market.

    Without glycogen restoration and electrolyte replacement, the body simply cannot begin the process of recovery. With Palatinose and Vitalyte’s amazing electrolyte profile, Complete Recovery will replace glycogen stores and balance electrolytes.

    Complete Recovery’s Amino Complex helps the body begin protein synthesis without weighing the body down.  Our special blend of these necessary amino acids help muscles repair faster and more efficiently.

    Vitalyte Sports Nutrition has introduced the most advanced Recovery Complex ever! Superoxide Dismutase, the most aggressive and potent free radical scavenger ever, leads the charge against full body inflammation and oxidative stress brought on by intense exercise. Add to that Beta Alanine and Glucosamine, and you have a powerful combination that helps muscles and joints heal faster.

    Complete Recovery is the first product of its kind to address the many needs of the modern athlete. With the most intelligent recovery system ever created, Complete Recovery allows athletes to decrease joint and tissue damage, rebuild muscles, improve cognitive focus, shorten recovery times and ultimately improve performance.

    Visit REI near you to pick up your Complete Recovery!

  • Reason #2 - Motivation, Pain and the Great Oreo Cookie Caper

    Reason #2 – Motivation, Pain and the Great Oreo Cookie Caper

    We have all heard the “No Pain, No Gain” theory and to a certain extent this is true, but pain can also be the fastest way to demotivate someone to continue a New Year’s Resolution Workout Plan.

    Let’s go back to talking about Bob. Now that bob has calculated his Basal Metabolic Rate and his Harris Benedict magic number, Bob is ready to hit the gym and start shedding that 10 pounds, or 35,000 calories.

    Day 1 – Knowing that afternoons are hectic and his chances of getting to the gym after work are slim to nil, Bob sets the alarm for an hour earlier than normal so he can work out and still be back home in time to help the kids get off to school. Bob rolls out of bed at 5:30 and pulls on his workout clothes which he got as a very supportive gift from the kids for Christmas. Bob is at the gym by 5:45, right on schedule to meet the other hundreds of people who decided that this was the morning to begin their New Year’s resolutions of getting back in shape. A spot on the treadmill opens up and Bob hurries to claim his place before anyone else can get there. In a frantic rush to make sure that he can get a workout in, Bob forgets to stretch.

    Bob selects a program from the onboard treadmill computer and within a couple minutes is jogging at a good clip. 10 minutes goes by and Bob thinks “This is not half bad.” Another ten minutes goes by and now Bob is starting to feel the burn. His underused muscles aren’t use to this kind of pace. By 29 minutes Bob is in pure agony. His lungs are screaming at him to stop and his heart is ready to beat out of his chest. But Bob is determined to finish his thirty minutes of cardio and burn that 310 calories.

    The clock reaches 30 minutes and Bob pounds the stop button on the treadmill. Even though his legs are on fire and he thinks his heart rate is somewhere north of 2 million beats a minute, a small smile appears on his face. Day 1 in the bag. I can do this Bob thinks to himself.

    Bob heads home, cleans up and gets ready for his work day. He kisses his wife and kids goodbye and heads to the office where he sits in his cubicle till lunch. Bob even decides to have a salad for lunch as further proof of his motivation to get back in shape. However, after lunch Bob comes back to the office where one of his colleagues has left a tray of holiday cookies out in the conference room. Bob, recognizing that he has really worked out for the first time in years, decides he has earned a couple of cookies. The white chocolate dipped Oreos are his favorite so he grabs 5 of those and heads back to his desk. A couple hours later Bob has to use the copy machine strategically located right next to the conference room. After making his copies, Bob, in his most Ninja like manner, sneaks back into the conference room and grabs another handful of those delicious Oreo Cookies.

    Bob gets home at his usual time, hangs out with the family, takes the dog on a walk and orders up pizza for family movie night. The family crowds around the TV with pizza and a movie and Bob enjoys his couple large slices of pepperoni with a couple beers. Since Bob’s body isn’t use to getting up that early, he falls asleep shortly after the movie starts.

    At some point the kids get angry with Bob’s snoring and send him off to bed where he sets his alarm for the same time before drifting back off to sleep.

    The alarm’s obnoxious wailing wakes Bob from a dead sleep. He turns off the alarm, swings his legs out of bed, stands up and cries out in pain. Almost every muscle in his body is in agony. Bob instantly decides he can’t work out again and falls back into bed, glad for the extra hour of sleep. Right before he drifts back to sleep, he whispers out loud to none in particular. “I’ll go tomorrow.”

    Bob’s story might sound a little dramatic but is really the commonplace for most people looking to get back into shape. Tips we can learn from Bob: 1- Stretch. Gyms are crowded in the morning and it can be tough to get on a machine but afford yourself the extra 10 minutes to warm up and cool down. Your body will thank you the next day. 2- Snacks. Part of getting back in shape is training your body to always expect food. Now that you are working out, you will have more of an appetite. Oreo cookies, however are not the best way to reach your goals. Stock your desk with high fiber low sugar snacks like rice cakes or carrots. Diet Tips come tomorrow. 3- Hydration is Key. If you are working out you are sweating and losing electrolytes. Make sure to replace them with Vitalyte Electrolyte Replacement Solution. Make sure to drink more water throughout the day. Not only does it make a world of difference in keeping your body healthy, but it also fills you up and will help keep you away from the cookie plate. 4- Recovery is key. Vitalyte’s Complete Recovery will help buffer lactic acid, reduce inflammation, and synthesize protein to make sure that you don’t wake up the next day feeling like you were in a car wreck. 5- 3 Days a week to start. If you set the expectation that you will be at the gym 5 days a week right out of the gate, you will be sorely disappointed. Commit to getting there 3 days a week in the beginning and build. Your body will thank you and it will be a whole lot easier to maintain that kind of schedule.

  • Top 3 Reason's New Year's Resolutions Fail - Part 1 of 3

    Top 3 Reason’s New Year’s Resolutions Fail

    by Evan DeMarco

    For so many people out there, there comes a moment shortly after Christmas where you recognize a startling and somewhat scary fact. It is that moment that comes when getting dressed for work, or when reaching for the remote on the coffee table, or even while preparing that third plate of leftovers. Your brain finally recognizes your expanding waistline brought on by overindulgence consistent with the holiday season. Enter New Year’s Resolutions. They usually sound something like: I’m going to finally lose those ten pounds, or I’m going to get back in shape, or I’m going to get back into those jeans I love so much. Whatever the actual resolution, a vast majority of fitness or lifestyle based resolutions fail for all the same reasons. #1 – Setting Unrealistic Expectations The Problem - The TV is ripe this time of year with infomercials selling the latest and greatest exercise and diet fads. They all seem to have the same ridiculous sales pitch. Lose 20 pounds in 2 weeks. Take 5 inches off your waistline. Get back that sexy more confident you in only 4 minutes a day. Crap, Crap and more crap. These infomercial products all offer a quick fix to a big problem and history has always shown that these never work. The Solution – Throw away the scale, stop watching those infomercials and set a realistic goal. Just because you put on 15-20 pounds in two months doesn’t mean you can take it off that quickly. How do you set that goal? Time to do some math. Get a pen and paper and do the equation below based on your gender.

    Women: BMR = 655 + ( 4.35 x weight in pounds ) + ( 4.7 x height in inches ) - ( 4.7 x age in years ) Men: BMR = 66 + ( 6.23 x weight in pounds ) + ( 12.7 x height in inches ) - ( 6.8 x age in year )

    This equation is the Basal Metabolic Rate. It determines how many calories you need to function if you did nothing but lay in bed all day long. Now on to Harris Benedict: Harris Benedict Formula To determine your total daily calorie needs, multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor, as follows: • If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2 • If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375 • If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55 • If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725 • If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9

    The Harris Benedict Equation determines the calorie intake required to maintain weight based on your activity level.

    Now we get into the most complicated aspect of weight loss called the Evan DeMarco Equation (that’s me by the way). This is a principle of weight loss that is so complex, most people have a hard time following it. Are you Ready? Here it is:

    Eat more calories than you burn in a day and you gain weight. Burn more calories in a day than you eat and you will lose weight.

    Ok, so it really isn’t that complex at all, but so many try to make it that way so they can sell you something. Let’s break this down so it all makes sense. To do that, we will use Bob as our test subject. Bob is a middle aged insurance underwriter with two kids, a dog and mini-van (shame on you for the mini van Bob). Bob is 38 years old, 6 feet tall, weighs 195 pounds. He walks the dog every day and plays with his kids on the weekend but doesn’t really get any other exercise. Bob’s BSM is roughly 1911. That is the number of calories Bob will burn if he does nothing but lay around all day long.

    Bob is lightly active so is Harris Benedict number is 2627. That number represents the number of calories Bob must eat to maintain his 195 pounds at his current activity level.

    There are roughly 3500 calories in a pound of fat. Bob would like to weigh 185 pounds so he has a calorie differential of 35,000.

    Let’s say Bob joins a local health club to get back in shape and starts off jogging on a treadmill for 30 minutes a day. He will burn roughly 310 calories. Assuming Bob doesn’t change his eating habits and sticks with his regiment, he will have to repeat the same 30 minute exercise for 112 days to reach his goal of 10 pounds.

    So back to setting realistic expectations. Bob represents the most simplistic way of looking at weight loss and doesn’t factor in other concepts that we will get to later on but you can see why many people will get frustrated when it comes to weight loss.

    Use this formula to understand what it takes to lose a pound of fat. Knowing is half the battle.

  • Born this Way

    Ibuprofen-4 dollars. Hot soup-3 dollars. New footsie pajamas-25 dollars. Taking a few days off from training because of cold-priceless. In the past I used to push through training when I was a little under the weather but the wiser, gentler me actually takes this time to step back, take a few days to completely recover and then go back to training a little fresher than before. This week when I was sick, I sat back one evening and actually took account of all that I ask my body to do in a typical day. I was pretty impressed, if I do say so myself, with the demands and tasks that I physically and mentally meet and achieve each day. Geeze, no wonder I need a little down time here and there. Now that I am working, I have to integrate my training with my work schedule and when my body calls for rest I have to listen. Sometimes I need to squeeze my run in during a 45 minute window between meetings or get up extra early so I can put in six or seven miles while most people’s alarms are still an hour from ringing. People always ask me what “drives” me to continue this journey. Many say “aren’t you too old to resume competitive running? Why don’t you just take it easy and run for fun?” I guess they just don’t understand the fact that, as Lady GaGa puts it, “Baby, I was born this way.” I was always the first one up in the morning at my household when I was growing up and I was the last to bed. I didn’t have hyper out of control energy, I just always knew what I wanted to do. At age five I ran a soccer jog-a-thon. It was about 90 degrees out that balmy summer day and everyone, including my parents, tried to get me to stop running. The heat didn’t bother me and I had no clue that the 20 continuous laps I ran around the high school dirt track was equal to five miles. Running was just always something I loved to do. So now when I need some time off I simply stop. I take a few days to regather and I know the recalibrating my body needs to do will happen and the next week will be a better week of training. And with a little over six months to go before the Hollywood Half, I know that I will be right back on track with training next week and my body will be healthy and rested. Not to mention I have a stellar pair of new footsie pajamas for the next time I need a few days off!

  • Clearing the Air

    You know those runners whose minds go blank when they work out? The ones who say, “My head goes silent and I just concentrate on the road?” Well, I’m not one of them. If anything, I use the time to constructively work through the day’s events. For me, it’s cheap therapy. I go until I feel better, the problem is solved or I’m just too exhausted to worry about it anymore. So by the time the endorphin rush kicks in, I’m already halfway to Happy Land. Some of the best ideas of my life have come to me on long runs where I let my mind wander. The more there is to process, the faster the workout goes and the more refreshed I feel.

    Adversely, I find when I “concentrate on the road” my workouts seem tedious and all-around unenjoyable. I become overly occupied with the click in my left knee, the tightness of my sport bra, my breathing, my pace and how much distance I should cover. I notice other runners on the road and feel compelled to compare our strides. To me, concentrating on the road is a lot like sitting at your desk on a Friday afternoon and watching the clock tick down to 5 o’clock. But I know this is what many do when they lace their running shoes.

    No matter your preference: letting the miles fly by as you jam to your favorite tunes, periodically checking your watch as you pass pre-set road markers or letting the free time act as your therapist, there is no wrong way to enjoy your workout. Runners may take different routes, but we all end up at the same place at the end—better off than we started.

  • New Year's Resolutions Part 1 - Motivation

    Now that the ball has dropped on 2010 and most of you have expunged the toxic effects of such a decadent holiday from your body, it's time to get down to business. And as the business saying goes, plan your work and work your plan.

    There are over 6 billion people on the planet and no two are alike, something to keep in mind when searching out the perfect workout plan or listening to claims that one plan is the perfect one. In addition, each person’s goals are different so what works for one person may not work for another so this week will discuss a few different plans and strategies, but first...

    Let’s talk about Motivation:

    The hardest thing to do is stay motivated. Whether you’re a high performance endurance athlete or weekend warrior, lack of motivation will always rear its ugly head. I’ll throw out my tips for staying motivated but I urge all of the readers to sound off on this topic. It probably the biggest adversary to getting and staying in shape.

    1-Strength in numbers is the way to go. Find a gym friend that is in the same physical shape you are in and commit to each other at least three days a week. You are a lot more likely to show up knowing that someone is there waiting for you.

    2- Get it out of the way. By working out in the morning you are less likely to come up with 1001 BS excuses on why you can’t hit the gym after you get off work. Plus, you’ll burn more fat by boosting your metabolism earlier in the day.

    3-Make it count. Life isn’t about just showing up, it’s about showing up and kicking some butt. If you are going to drag yourself out of bed earlier than normal to go to the gym, then show up with a plan and work that plan.

    4-Get your fuel. Vitalyte Tri-Phase Endurance Fuel is the perfect early morning endurance formula to get you going. Its 3 stages of energy get you moving quicker and keep you going longer. Losing weight and getting in shape is a very simple thing. Eat more calories than you burn and you’ll gain weight. Burn more calories than you eat and you’ll lose weight. By using Tri-Phase Endurance Fuel, you will be able to burn more calories and push yourself harder and longer than ever before.

    5- Pump up the Volume. Wolf Blitzer, Ellen Degeneres and Oprah Winfrey are about as motivating to a workout as a pitcher of margaritas and a cheesecake. Personally, I would rather shoot my left foot off with a shotgun then watch Dr. Phil. Gyms and healthclubs usually have some form of coma inducing TV playing front and center of the all the cardio equipment. Ignore it and get out the Ipod or whatever MP3 Player you have and get some music that’s motivating. In fact, 5 bonus points go to those of you that post some great workout tunes.

    6-Realistic Expectations – Muscle and Fitness, Men’s Health, Shape and an entire rack of drugstore magazines are great for getting work out tips but really bad for setting unrealistic expectations. Don’t be discouraged if you don’t look like the cover model after a week in the gym and remember, these models get paid large amounts of money to look like that and have almost unlimited resources at their disposal. If your job was to workout 8 hours a day with a trainer who probably helps prepare all your meals, and you were getting paid a ton of cash for it, you would look like tha too. Many fitness enthusiasts will tell you to set a pound a week as a goal for weight loss. I say throw out the damn scale. A watched pot never boils and a closely monitored scale will only serve to frustrate you. You’ll know your plan is working when you clothes fit differently or when you look in the mirror.

    Hopefully you now have a better recipe for success for your New Year's Resolution. Motivation will always be a problem so take the steps to get and stay motivated and you're half way to achieving your goal. More importantly, you are taking steps to a healthier and happier lifestyle.

    Next Topic: Cardio...

  • An Early Start on the New Year's Resolution

    If your holidays are anything like mine, you probably find yourself consuming way too many calories. Countless holiday parties lead to overindulgence on an epic scale, and the next thing you know the pants are fitting a little tighter. The holiday season is the perfect storm of bad habits all aimed directly at your mid-section. Of course, with the perfect storm comes the perfect solution. Insert New Year’s resolution here like work out 6 days a week, or lose 15 pounds…and then start laughing like I just did as I wrote that. I’m sure that all New Year’s resolutions begin with the best of intentions, which conjures up something my grandfather used to say about the road to hell and all of those good intentions.

    Let’s fast forward to January 2nd. You are at the gym, maybe in the new gym clothes you picked specifically to motivate you back to your former physical glory. Your Ipod has the latest music you find inspiring enough to get you through the 30-45 minutes of cardio you set out to do. You step up on the treadmill and push the necessary sequence of buttons to begin your first workout of the year. Maybe it goes well and maybe it doesn’t. Maybe you finish your workout and head home with the sense that everything is going to be all right come summer and swimsuit season. Maybe you realized that running on a treadmill sucks and you are already dreading the next day, perhaps thinking about relocating to Alaska where you can hide all of your holiday weight underneath the biggest North Face jacket on the market.

    Regardless of how your first day or first week goes, the vast majority of people never make it past March. Don’t believe me. Go into your local gym on January 2nd and then again on March 2nd and tell me differently.

    There are a myriad of factors that cause the rapid decline in gym attendance. Motivation, lack of planning, lack of results, muscle soreness and an insatiable desire to plop your butt down on the couch and stare at a box for hours on end are to name just a few.

    Over the next few weeks I am going to offer up my tips for getting and staying in shape after the holidays. Here is my invitation to all of the fitness community out there: Get involved, help each other out, offer advice and share your successes and failures. Technology allows us to join together in the fight against a sedentary lifestyle. I want to see every Vitalyte Fan post at least one thing during the month of January. I say we get a jump start on shredding those Pumpkin Pie induced extra poundage. Let me know how you plan to beat back the holiday fat after the ball drops and 2011 begins…

  • What The Heck Is An Interval?

    Anthropology teaches us that each group or sub-culture on this planet has its unique customs, greetings, languages and even style of dress. Now that I have joined the wacky ranks of the running community I am finding this to be very true.

    My first exposure to the language of runners was a term Carol, my running coach casually called “interval”. My naïve response was , “What the heck is an interval”?

    You know that sadistic look people get in their eye when they know something you don’t and that knowledge usually has something to do with you curled up in the fetal position? Well, that is the look I got from Carol. That look was answer enough to making the hairs on the back of my neck stand up and make me start to question my desire to become a runner.

    Interval training, as she explained it, is bursts of intense exercise followed by periods of moderate rest. Translation: Run till you feel like you’re going to yack, and then walk it off.

    So this was day 1 running. As I mentioned in my last blog, I will be running a 5k in December and then hopefully a 10k in January or February. As this is my first day and running is not something I have ever done before, I’m trying to figure out what would be a good time for a first 5k.

    Any suggestions from my fellow runners?

  • Runners Are Insane, Can I be One?

    First off I should explain that this is my first blog ever, so bear with me. Next, I guess I should point out that this blog is about me running, something I have never done before, so again please bear with me.

    I’m going to be completely honest and say what I have thought about runners for a very long time. Bottom Line – they are insane. I can appreciate that our ancestors found it necessary to be good runners. I think the old saying is “you don’t have to be the fastest guy, you just don’t want to be the slowest,” which seems especially poignant when you are being chased by a saber tooth tiger. The better runners were less likely to wind up as dinner. However, it seemed that with our evolution as a species, and our rise to the top of the food chain, the need to be great runners became an outdated fashion, much like tight rolling jeans or Devo.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for staying in shape but I would watch footage of some of our athletes running marathons and it didn’t look like they were having fun. I live in San Diego and at the right time of day 26 miles can be painful with 350 horsepower doing all of the heavy lifting. Why on Earth would someone choose to run that? How on Earth can someone run that?

    Well, as the human species evolved and we stopped running to stay alive and started running to stay in shape, I too evolved in my thinking about this concept of running. One of two things happened. Either I began to see running in a different light or ultimately some seed of insanity took root in the nether regions of my brain and I figured “what the heck, I’ll buy some running shoes and start jogging.”

    So here I am, 43 years old and the extent of my running has been chasing the UPS driver down across the parking lot to ensure a Vitalyte customer gets their order. But I digress. Now I am committed to training for a 5k, then a 10k and assuming I don’t suffer some debilitating shin splints along the way, eventually the half marathon.

    So between now and the end of December when I compete in my first 5k, I will be posting to this blog a couple times a week sharing with the rest of the active community that makes up the core group of Vitalyte enthusiasts, my running story. So this message goes out to that select group of insane people. Please forgive me in my misguided judgment of your mental competence. I humbly beg your forgiveness and ask permission to join your wacky ranks as a runner.

  • The Journey from COO to Runner

    Chances are that if you have ever called Vitalyte’s corporate office you have spoken to Evan Lucas. Even if you haven’t called our office but ordered Vitalyte from the website you are familiar with his work. You see, Evan Lucas has been moving silently behind the scenes at Vitalyte’s corporate office in San Diego for over a decade ensuring that the very best electrolyte drink available makes it into the hands of our customers. He embodies, in my opinion, the very definition of work ethic and commitment and it shows in every aspect of our operational business. He is our COO and I would personally like to thank him for all of his tireless dedication and hard work. How am I going to thank him you ask? By giving him more work.

    As most of you know, Vitalyte began over 40 years ago when our original founder, Bill Gookin got sick on a popular commercial sports drink at the Olympic Marathon trials. Being a biochemist, he decided to create a drink that real athletes could use while competing. What started out as a way to gain a competitive edge evolved into the best sports drink on the market.

    Being as how our company history began with running, Evan Lucas has decided to take up running as a hobby and a way to stay in shape. Not only is he getting up at the crack of dawn to train for a 5k, 10k and half marathon, now we are making him blog about it.

    Vitalyte represents the very best in sports nutrition and that is a job we take very seriously. Of course we still like to have a little fun so I encourage you all to follow Evan on his journey as he trains for a 5k, 10k, and half marathon. Get involved. Offer tips. Or maybe begin your own training program and run right along with him.

    Evan DeMarco

    CEO

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