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beginner runners

  • Not Your Typical Runner

    Berea Thompson -- Vitalyte Brand Ambassador

    Each race we host along the Huntington Beach bike trail teaches me something about running, and the HB Ocean Run on May 17th did once again!

    If you looked at the crowd of 50 people standing on the beach that day, you would have thought maybe they were meeting for a beach clean up, or possibly a group book club, or maybe some sort of AA support group (they actually host these meetings down by Beach Blvd), but you probably wouldn’t have thought they were all athletes about to run their hearts out for a 5k, 10k 15k, or a half-marathon! That’s because they didn’t look like societies “stero-typical” runner.

    Before getting into the racing scene (running in local non-profit 5k fundraiser, joining the craziness at big Rock ‘n Roll Marathons and then eventually hosting my own races) I would have told someone a typical runner is a single 22 year old that’s super tall, a model of fitness, geared up in Nike DriFIT, and prances like a gazelle when running (and their hair flowing all the same). But I would have been totally wrong!

    If you look at national survey data by runningusa.org they found the typical female runner is married of the age 39, 5’5”, 140 lb and motivated to run in order to stay in shape. The typical male runner is married of the age 44, 5’10”, 174 lb and also motivated to run in order to stay in shape. Although their favorite running apparel is Nike, I had everything else wrong!

    I’m glad my stereotypical view of a runner was wrong! I see every age, race, size, and shape at our races and I love it, because running is for everyone! The fastest 5k runner at the Ocean Run was a 66 year old man. The second fastest half marathon runner was a 45 year old woman. And the 10k neck and neck race to the finish was between two men well above their 20’s :)

    All you need to do to be a runner is to strap on a pair of shoes and hit the pavement. It doesn’t matter the distance you go or the speed you travel as long as you are out there giving it your all and enjoying every minute. Besides, with Vitalytes greatest Electrolyte Drink you will feel just like that gazelle runner!

  • Milena’s Top 5 Tips for Staying Motivated: #2: Change Your Pace

    #2: Change Your Pace

    Your body needs variety in it’s training pace just as much as it needs variety in the type of cardiovascular training you do. Therefore, changing the speed at which you run is important.

    One or two days a week don’t forget to throw some speed work into your training. That means running varied distances at faster than your normal steady run pace.

    The Swedes coined the phrase “Fartlek.” That translates to “speed play.” So let’s say you are out for a four mile run. Instead of running the entire run at one steady pace, mix up your pace. You don’t even need a watch.

    Legendary runner Jim Ryun used to run fast from one telephone pole to another along the straight stretches of road in Kansas. When he got to the next pole, he would jog slowly until he reached the next one and then he would pick up the pace again.

    Mix it up. Run fast for thirty seconds, and then easy for two minutes and then moderate for three minutes. You get the idea.

  • Milena’s Top 5 Tips for Staying Motivated: #1

    In my last blog I discussed the best ways to train for your first 5k. Well, now that you have conquered that race and are settled into yourchester-cheetahtraining program, what do you, as a beginner runner, do to stay motivated?

    You asked for it, so here it is...Milena’s Top 5 Tips for Staying Motivated.

    In the nature of keeping you on your toes, I thought I'd start with number 1. Stay tuned for the 4 to follow.

    Don’t run as much!

    No you are not still hung over from the beer garden at yesterday’s 5k. Read it again. Don’t run as much. That’s right. The number one reason people lose interest in something is because they have become burned out by doing it too much. Is this a scientific fact? I don’t know, but trust me I know what I am talking about.

    Think of it this way. Remember the time when you were a kid and you over-indulged on Cheetos (or any food...and yes I am speaking from experience)? Tell me if you can even look at Chester the Cheetah the same way. I am right. Anything we over-indulge in eventually makes us sick and we never can stomach it the same way. Running is the same.

    So what’s the best compromise? Here’s a little secret...take mini breaks. I’m not saying you have to take a month off from training. Instead, here and there take a weekend off. Or do what I do. I run three to four days a week and the other days I cross-train. And mix that up too. Spin on the bike, jump into the pool for a few laps or grab your tennis racquet and play a few sets. I guarantee you will actually look forward to your runs when you don’t run everyday.

    Avoid the running trap of “more is better.” That way Chester gets to remain that undoubtedly cool cat in your mind instead of a little orange gremlin who loves to ruin your seventh birthday.

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