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harris benedict equation

  • Top 3 Reason's New Year's Resolutions Fail - Part 1 of 3

    Top 3 Reason’s New Year’s Resolutions Fail

    by Evan DeMarco

    For so many people out there, there comes a moment shortly after Christmas where you recognize a startling and somewhat scary fact. It is that moment that comes when getting dressed for work, or when reaching for the remote on the coffee table, or even while preparing that third plate of leftovers. Your brain finally recognizes your expanding waistline brought on by overindulgence consistent with the holiday season. Enter New Year’s Resolutions. They usually sound something like: I’m going to finally lose those ten pounds, or I’m going to get back in shape, or I’m going to get back into those jeans I love so much. Whatever the actual resolution, a vast majority of fitness or lifestyle based resolutions fail for all the same reasons. #1 – Setting Unrealistic Expectations The Problem - The TV is ripe this time of year with infomercials selling the latest and greatest exercise and diet fads. They all seem to have the same ridiculous sales pitch. Lose 20 pounds in 2 weeks. Take 5 inches off your waistline. Get back that sexy more confident you in only 4 minutes a day. Crap, Crap and more crap. These infomercial products all offer a quick fix to a big problem and history has always shown that these never work. The Solution – Throw away the scale, stop watching those infomercials and set a realistic goal. Just because you put on 15-20 pounds in two months doesn’t mean you can take it off that quickly. How do you set that goal? Time to do some math. Get a pen and paper and do the equation below based on your gender.

    Women: BMR = 655 + ( 4.35 x weight in pounds ) + ( 4.7 x height in inches ) - ( 4.7 x age in years ) Men: BMR = 66 + ( 6.23 x weight in pounds ) + ( 12.7 x height in inches ) - ( 6.8 x age in year )

    This equation is the Basal Metabolic Rate. It determines how many calories you need to function if you did nothing but lay in bed all day long. Now on to Harris Benedict: Harris Benedict Formula To determine your total daily calorie needs, multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor, as follows: • If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2 • If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375 • If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55 • If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725 • If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9

    The Harris Benedict Equation determines the calorie intake required to maintain weight based on your activity level.

    Now we get into the most complicated aspect of weight loss called the Evan DeMarco Equation (that’s me by the way). This is a principle of weight loss that is so complex, most people have a hard time following it. Are you Ready? Here it is:

    Eat more calories than you burn in a day and you gain weight. Burn more calories in a day than you eat and you will lose weight.

    Ok, so it really isn’t that complex at all, but so many try to make it that way so they can sell you something. Let’s break this down so it all makes sense. To do that, we will use Bob as our test subject. Bob is a middle aged insurance underwriter with two kids, a dog and mini-van (shame on you for the mini van Bob). Bob is 38 years old, 6 feet tall, weighs 195 pounds. He walks the dog every day and plays with his kids on the weekend but doesn’t really get any other exercise. Bob’s BSM is roughly 1911. That is the number of calories Bob will burn if he does nothing but lay around all day long.

    Bob is lightly active so is Harris Benedict number is 2627. That number represents the number of calories Bob must eat to maintain his 195 pounds at his current activity level.

    There are roughly 3500 calories in a pound of fat. Bob would like to weigh 185 pounds so he has a calorie differential of 35,000.

    Let’s say Bob joins a local health club to get back in shape and starts off jogging on a treadmill for 30 minutes a day. He will burn roughly 310 calories. Assuming Bob doesn’t change his eating habits and sticks with his regiment, he will have to repeat the same 30 minute exercise for 112 days to reach his goal of 10 pounds.

    So back to setting realistic expectations. Bob represents the most simplistic way of looking at weight loss and doesn’t factor in other concepts that we will get to later on but you can see why many people will get frustrated when it comes to weight loss.

    Use this formula to understand what it takes to lose a pound of fat. Knowing is half the battle.

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